Please alert us to any other recent or forthcoming books by Rhodes Scholars by emailing development@rhodeshouse.ox.ac.uk or use the Rhodes Scholar Information Update form here.

2016

Forests Are Gold: Trees, People, and Environmental Rule in Vietnam

Pam McElwee (Kansas & Wadham 1993)

Forests Are Gold examines the management of Vietnam's forests in the tumultuous twentieth century--from French colonialism to the recent transition to market-oriented economics - as the country united, prospered, and transformed people and landscapes. Forest policy has rarely been about ecology or conservation for nature's sake, but about managing citizens and society, a process Pamela McElwee terms "environmental rule." Untangling and understanding these practices and networks of rule illuminates not just thorny issues of environmental change, but also the birth of Vietnam itself.

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2017

Unlikely Partners

Julian Gewirtz (Connecticut & St Edmund Hall 2013)

Unlikely Partners recounts the story of how Chinese politicians and intellectuals looked beyond their country’s borders for economic guidance at a key crossroads in the nation’s tumultuous twentieth century. Julian Gewirtz offers a dramatic tale of competition for influence between reformers and hardline conservatives during the Deng Xiaoping era, bringing to light China’s productive exchanges with the West. Read reviews in the The Economist and Financial Times.

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2016

Democracy Against Domination

K. Sabeel Rahman (New York & Pembroke 2005)

This book is a new response to economic and social inequality as well as democratic theory and democratic institutional design.

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2016

Fighting Hurt: Rule and Exception in Torture and War

Henry Shue (North Carolina & Merton 1961)

Fighting Hurt brings together key essays by Henry Shue on the issue of torture, and relatedly, the moral challenges surrounding the initiation and conduct of war, and features a new introduction outlining the argument of the essays, putting them into context, and describing how and in what ways his position has modified over time.

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2016

A Boy on the Last Boat: A Journey Around the World

Dr Ben Lochtenberg (Western Australia & Brasenose 1954)

Lochtenberg's memoir: A Singapore-born young colonial Dutch boy, whose father suffered and died as a Japanese prisoner of war building a railway in Sumatra, escaped from Java with his mother and arrived as a refugee in Australia in 1942. Educated by Jesuits and then at the University of Western Australia and at Oxford, he had a career with ICI initially as an engineer, ending in 1993 following senior executive and Board roles in Australia, England, Canada and finally in the United States. His life from childhood in European colonies in Asia, spanned major changes in technology and the chemical industry. With his wife and seven children, he experienced and adjusted to a wide range of cultures and societies. During the twenty years of retirement in Melbourne, he has been active in mental health research at the University of Melbourne, Newman College, in support of palliative care, homelessness and refugees - the latter being where his story began

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2016

Competing Against Luck

Clayton Christensen (Utah & Queen's 1975), Taddy Hall, Karen Dillon, David S. Duncan

How do companies know how to grow? How can they create products that they are sure customers want to buy? Can innovation be more than a game of hit and miss? Harvard Business School professor Clayton Christensen has the answer. A generation ago, Christensen revolutionised business with his groundbreaking theory of disruptive innovation. Now, he goes further, offering powerful new insights.

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2016

Living Longer, Living Better: Lifestyle, Exercise, Diet, an Yoga for Heart and Mind

Professor Lionel Opie (Cape Province & Lincoln 1956)

Living Longer, Living Better: Lifestyle, Exercise, Diet and Yoga for Heart and Mind is written for all those who strive for optimal long-term health and the maximal functioning of their hearts and minds. Dr. Opie has examined the hard science behind the purported health benefits of practices such as diet, meditation, yoga, and prayer.

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2016

Constitutional Conventions and the Headship of State: Australian Experience

Dr Donald Markwell (Queensland & Trinity 1981)

Constitutional Conventions and the Headship of State: Australian Experience by Dr Donald Markwell (Queensland & Trinity 1981) discusses conventions and other practice relating to the Crown in Australia’s Westminster-style system of government responsible to Parliament. Papers consider the “Australianisation” of the Crown since federation in 1901, the evolution of a modern Australian office of Governor-General (exemplified by Sir Zelman Cowen, Dame Quentin Bryce, and others), and the continuing debate on an Australian republic. Controversies analysed include the exercise of the “reserve powers” by Governor-General Sir John Kerr to resolve the 1975 constitutional crisis, the long but now controversial practice of Governors-General consulting High Court judges on the exercise of their constitutional discretions, and the conventions that relate to “hung parliaments” and to ministerial resignations. These studies highlight the need for careful consideration of constitutional principles and precedents to an understanding of conventions and the office of Governor-General of Australia. Several Rhodes Scholars feature prominently, including Sir Zelman Cowen, Sir Kenneth Wheare, Dr Eugene Forsey, and others. (Connor Court, 2016).

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