Please alert us to any other recent or forthcoming books by Rhodes Scholars by emailing development@rhodeshouse.ox.ac.uk or use the Rhodes Scholar Information Update form here.

2016

Old Age: A Beginner's Guide

Michael Kinsley (Michigan & Magdalen 1972)

In this series of essays, Michael Kinsley uses his own battle with Parkinson’s disease to unearth answers to questions we are all at some time forced to confront. “Sometimes,” he writes, “I feel like a scout from my generation, sent out ahead to experience in my fifties what even the healthiest Boomers are going to experience in their sixties, seventies, or eighties.”

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2016

Senator Pressler: An Independent Mission to Save Our Democracy

Larry Pressler (South Dakota & St Edmund Hall 1964)

An Independent Mission to Save our Democracy outlines a plan to reform U.S. presidential and national politics. It also conveys the journey of Pressler's unexpected candidacy as an Independent and instils hope that with some much-needed effort, America can achieve a political renaissance. 

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2016

Ethical Issues Raised by the SARS Outbreak in Toronto

Leo Paquin (British Columbia & Merton 1992)

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) was first recognized in Guangdong Province, China in November 2002. Subsequent to its introduction to Hong Kong in mid-February 2003, the virus spread to more than 30 countries infecting over 8,000 individuals across five continents. Toronto was particularly affected and SARS's outbreak there resulted in the emergence of five ethical issues in the following areas: isolation and quarantine, privacy and personal information, professional duty of care, collateral damage and the WHO's SARS-related Travel Advisory for Toronto. In this book each of those topics will be explored and the philosophy of the World's response to SARS will be discussed.

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2016

How Can I Help?: A Week in My Life as a Psychiatrist

David Goldbloom (Nova Scotia & Exeter 1975)

In How Can I Help? A Week in My Life as a Psychiatrist, he presents himself as a model of a hospital-based psychiatrist, though not to advance a theory or treatment, but to “make our profession better understood … [by bringing] you to the front lines of modern psychiatry – the inside of the psychiatric hospital.” His goal, shared by his co-author and fellow psychiatrist Pier Bryden, is to reduce public fear of psychiatrists by showing what it is they really do, the conditions they treat, the resources they deploy and the setting in which they work.

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2017

Approval Junkie: Adventures in Caring Too Much

Faith Salie (Georgia & Magdalen 1993)

Approval Junkie: Adventures in Caring Too Much by Faith Salie (Georgia & Magdalen 1993) is a look at all that the author has done in the name of validation. "Whether it’s trying to impress her parents with a perfect GPA, undergoing an exorsism in the hopes of saving her toxic marriage, or maintaining the BMI of “a flapper with a touch of dysentery,” Salie is the ultimate approval seeker—an “approval junkie,” if you will." The book is a collection of daring, funny essays chronicling her adventures during her lifelong quest for approval. (Crown Archetype, April 2016).

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2016

Bypass Wall Street: A Biologist’s Guide to the Rat Race

Dr Joanna Masel (Australia-at-Large & Merton 1997)

Pundits urge you to save more money for retirement. But you can’t eat piles of saved money; unless this money is used to increase our ability to produce food, medicine and nursing, the money might as well be destroyed today and reprinted later. How is money saved today converted into something that will be useful decades from now? In the meantime, who benefits from these pools of saved money? In a radical rethink, evolutionary biologist Joanna Masel (Australia-at-Large & Merton 1997) uses insights about competition and demography to deconstruct the false economic premises behind our bloated financial system. By returning to the basics of what investment means, Masel delivers accessible advice not only for policy makers, but also for individuals, suggesting alternatives that work for your benefit rather than the benefit of financiers. Ordinary individuals can bypass the middleman, and take direct control over how their saved money is converted into enduring wealth. This book challenges you to think differently, and gives new meaning to the old advice to invest only in things you understand. (Perforce Publishing, January 2016).

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2016

United: Thoughts on Finding Common Ground and Advancing the Common Good

Cory Booker (New Jersey & Queen's 1992)

United: Thoughts on Finding Common Ground and Advancing the Common Good by Cory Booker (New Jersey & Queen's 1992) draws on personal experience to issue a stirring call to the US nation and US politics around the principles of compassion and solidarity. It is his account of his own political education, the moments—some entertaining, some heartbreaking, all of them enlightening—that have shaped his civic vision. Here are the lessons Senator Booker learned from the remarkable people who inspired him to serve, men and women whose example fueled his desire to create opportunities for others. Also included are his observations on the issues he cares about most deeply, from race and crime and the crisis of mass incarceration to economic and environmental justice. (Ballantine Books, February 2016).

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2016

Displacement, Development, and Climate Change: International organizations moving beyond their mandates

Nina Hall (New Zealand & St Antony's 2009)

Displacement, Development, and Climate Change: International organizations moving beyond their mandates by Nina Hall (New Zealand & St Antony's 2009) focuses on one critical challenge: climate change. Climate change is predicted to lead to an increased intensity and frequency of natural disasters. An increase in extreme weather events, global temperatures and higher sea levels may lead to displacement and migration, and will affect many dimensions of the economy and society. Although scholars are examining the complexity and fragmentation of the climate change regime, they have not examined how our existing international development, migration and humanitarian organizations are dealing with climate change. This book looks at three institutions: the United Nations High Commission for Refugees, the International Organization for Migration and the United Nations Development Programme, and asks: how have these inter-governmental organizations responded to climate change? (Routledge, May 2016).

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